Welcome to Our Practice

Our physicians provide foot and ankle care in the Tri-County area including: Berkley, Southfield, Royal Oak, Oak Park, and Ferndale.

Drs. Hoffman, B. Kissel, C. Kissel, Popofski, Ungar, and Weitzman provide quality, comprehensive foot and ankle care to patients in Berkley and the surrounding communities. Combined, they have over 100 years of experience in podiatry and a genuine concern for patients. In adddition, the NorthPointe Foot & Ankle staff is dedicated to promptly attending to your comfort and care.

This web site provides you with an overview of our practice and the field of podiatry. As you navigate the site, you'll find information about our practice philosophy, physicians, office location, insurance policies, and appointment scheduling procedures. Please browse the site at your convenience and contact us with any questions. You can also schedule an appointment by clicking here.

Should your care require surgical intervention, we are on staff at many area hospitals including:

Surgical Foot Correction - Visit our Educational Video Section


Warm up your Neighbors November 12 - December 7
 
NorthPointe Foot & Ankle is joining the Berkley Senior Center in collecting NEW gloves, hats, scarves and socks for all ages.  The gifts will be distributed to those less fortunate in the community before Christmas. Monetary donations will also be accepted at NorthPointe Foot & Ankle front office and used to purchase needed items. Items may be dropped off at NorthPointe Foot & Ankle or the Berkley Senior Center during hours of operation.

Managing Your Diabetes
 
Healthy feet are essential for overall good health, no matter your age, fitness level, or physical challenges. For people with diabetes, however, taking care of their feet is especially vital. More than 60 percent of all non-traumatic lower-limb amputations worldwide are related to complications from the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association.
 
A 2012 study by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) indicates Hispanics with diabetes are particularly in danger,    because more than 90 percent of those with the disease or at risk for it have never seen a podiatrist as part of their health care.
 
The leading cause of hospitalization among people with diabetes—regardless of ethnicity—is foot ulcers and infections, but most of those problems are largely preventable. It’s important for those with the disease to receive regular foot exams by a podiatrist.
 
While ulcers—open sores on the foot—are the most common diabetes-related foot problem, several others are also serious and   prevalent, including neuropathy, skin changes, calluses, poor circulation, and infection. The nerve damage that diabetes causes may mean a person with an ulcer or injury may be unaware of it until it becomes infected. Infection can lead to partial or full amputation of the foot or lower leg. Regular care from a podiatrist can reduce amputation rates up to 80 percent, according to the APMA.
 
People with diabetes need to inspect their feet daily and be vigilant for warning signs of ulcers, including irritation, redness, cracked or dry skin (especially around the heels), or drainage on their socks. read more in our November Newsletter.
 

Welcome Dr. Aimee Popofski
 
NorthPointe Foot & Ankle is pleased to introduce the newest member of their podiatric team ,Dr. Aimee Popofski.
 
“Dr. Aimee Popofski is a welcome addition to our team,” said Dr. Lee Hoffman, NorthPointe Foot & Ankle partner.  “She is an experienced and considerate podiatrist that takes great care of her patients.  We are very confident that the residents in the communities we serve will find her care comprehensive and compassionate.”
 
Dr. Popofski earned her doctorate of podiatric medicine from California College of Podiatric Medicine and is board certified in foot surgery.  She comes to NorthPointe Foot & Ankle with more than 14 years of podiatric experience having worked at a busy practice in Commerce.  Although she treats foot and ankle concerns of all kinds, her focus is on the treatment of foot injuries and surgical repairs of foot issues. 
 
“This is an exciting new career opportunity for me.  I am looking forward to getting to know the patients of NorthPointe and helping them find solutions to their foot concerns, “ said Dr. Popofski. “I anticipate enjoying a long and positive experience with all associated with the practice.”
 
Dr. Popofski currently sees patients at NorthPointe Foot & Ankle on Wednesdays.  The office is accepting new patients.  In addition to NorthPointe, she practices at other offices within the Foot & Ankle Specialists of Southeast Michigan organization including Sterling Heights, Warren, and Livonia.
 
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Dr. Michael Schey Retires
To My Valued Patients,
 
After months of thought and consideration, I have made the decision to retire from active practice effective June 30, 2018.  Being able to spend more quality time with my spouse, children and grandchildren is of prime importance to me.  Finding more time to pursue my woodworking hobby will also be a plus!  I am looking forward to this chapter of my life and the adventures that await.
 
Foremost in my thoughts, however, is leaving you.  I am honored that you chose me to care for your foot and ankle needs throughout the years.  I truly value the friendships and associations that we have come to know. Of paramount importance to me is the certainty that I will be leaving your future care in capable hands.
 
My partners and associates have all demonstrated the ability to continue your care in a fashion that makes me confident that all of your podiatric needs will be met.  To that end, I have taken care to leave carefully drafted progress notes in your chart and have verbally discussed my intentions with each individual doctor.
 
The transition of your care should be seamless.  Drs. Charles Kissel and Lee Hoffman, as well as our associates Dr. Brian Kissel and Dr. Aimee Popofski, are knowledgeable, competent and compassionate physicians.  I am certain that they will provide you with excellent care for any of your foot and ankle needs.  Should they have any questions or concerns, I am only a phone call away.
 
I cannot begin to express how much I will miss our visits. It has been my pleasure and privilege to provide for your foot care needs.  If there is anything that the office staff or I can do to help you during this transition phase, please let us know,
 
Sincerely,
Michael S. Schey, D.P.M.

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Heel Pain - Plantar Fascitis
Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the band of tissue that extends from the heel to the toes. In this condition, the fascia first becomes irritated and then inflamed, resulting in heel pain. 
 
The most common cause of plantarfasciitis relates to faulty structure of the foot. For example, people who have problems with their arches, either overly flat feet or high-arched feet, are more prone to developing plantar fasciitis. 
Wearing non-supportive footwear on hard, flat surfaces puts abnormal strain on the plantar fascia and can also lead to plantar fasciitis. This is particularly evident when one’s job requires long hours on the feet. Obesity may also contribute to plantar fasciitis.     
 
The symptoms of plantar fasciitis are:
  • Pain on the bottom of the heel
  • Pain that is usually worse upon arising
  • Pain that increases over a period of months
People with plantar fasciitis often describe the pain as worse when they get up in the morning or after they’ve been sitting for long periods of time. After a few minutes of walking the pain decreases, because walking stretches the fascia. For some people the pain subsides but returns after spending long periods of time on their feet.  
 
Treatment of plantar fasciitis begins with first-line strategies, which you can begin at home:
  • Stretching exercises. Exercises that gently stretch out the calf muscles help ease pain and assist with  recovery. Stretching should NOT be done with full weight on the foot.
  • Avoid going barefoot. When you walk without shoes, you put undue strain and stress on your plantar fascia.
  • Ice. Putting an ice pack on your heel for 20 minutes several times a day helps reduce inflammation. Place a thin towel between the ice and your heel; do not apply ice directly to the skin.
  •  Limit activities. Cut down on extended physical activities to give your heel a rest.
  • Shoe modifications. Wearing supportive shoes that have good arch support and a slightly raised heel reduces stress on the plantar fascia.
  • Medications. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, may be recommended to reduce pain and inflammation.
If you still have pain after several weeks, see your NorthPointe podiatrist.  He/she may add one or more of these treatment approaches:
  • Padding and strapping. Placing pads in the shoe softens the impact of walking. Strapping helps support the foot and reduce strain on the fascia.
  • Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into your shoe help correct the underlying structural abnormalities causing the plantar fasciitis.
  • Injection therapy. In some cases, corticosteroid injections are used to help reduce the inflammation and relieve pain.
  • Walking cast. A walking cast may be used to keep your foot immobile for a few weeks to allow it to rest and heal.
  • Night splint. Wearing a night splint allows you to maintain an extended stretch of the plantar fascia while sleeping.
  • Physical therapy. Exercises and other physical therapy measures may be used to help provide relief.           
Although many patients with plantar fasciitis respond to non-surgical treatment, some patients may require additional treatment options. If, after several months of conservative treatment, you continue to have heel pain, there are alternative treatment options that should be considered. Your NorthPointe doctor will discuss Extracorporial Shockwave Therapy (ESWT), Micro debridement, Platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections, or surgical treatments with you and determine which approach would be mostbeneficial for your case.