Welcome to Our Practice

Our physicians provide foot and ankle care in the Tri-County area including: Berkley, Southfield, Royal Oak, Oak Park, and Ferndale.

Drs. Hoffman, B. Kissel, C. Kissel, Schey, Ungar, and Weitzman provide quality, comprehensive foot and ankle care to patients in Berkley and the surrounding communities. Combined, they have over 100 years of experience in podiatry and a genuine concern for patients. In adddition, the NorthPointe Foot & Ankle staff is dedicated to promptly attending to your comfort and care.

This web site provides you with an overview of our practice and the field of podiatry. As you navigate the site, you'll find information about our practice philosophy, physicians, office location, insurance policies, and appointment scheduling procedures. Please browse the site at your convenience and contact us with any questions. You can also schedule an appointment by clicking here.

Should your care require surgical intervention, we are on staff at many area hospitals including:

Surgical Foot Correction - Visit our Educational Video Section

 

Arthritis and Your Feet

Arthritis is an inflammation and swelling of the cartilage and lining of the joints, generally accompanied by an increase in the fluid in the joints. It is a disabling and occasionally crippling disease afflicting almost 50 million Americans. In some forms, it appears to be hereditary.  Although the prevalence of arthritis increases with age, all people from infancy to middle age are potential victims. People over 50 are the primary targets. 
 
The month of May has been set aside as National Arthritis Awareness Month.  It is a time to spread the message about prevention methods and treatment of arthritis.  NorthPointe Foot & Ankle has information to help understand the symptoms and treatments of arthritic feet.
 
There is usually no need to endure years of painful ambulation because of arthritic feet. Most conditions can be diagnosed and treated either conservatively or surgically by our NorthPointe podiatrists.
 
Because each foot has 33 joints that can be afflicted - and there is no way to avoid the tremendous weight-bearing load on the feet - feet are very susceptible to arthritis. Arthritic feet can result in loss of mobility and independence. However, early diagnosis and proper medical care can limit or slow the damage.
 
Symptoms include: early morning stiffness; limitation in motion of joint; recurring pain or tenderness in any joint; redness or heat in a joint; skin changes, including rashes and growths; and swelling in one or more joints.
 
Forms of Arthritis
Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is frequently called degenerative joint disease or wear and tear arthritis. Aging usually brings on a breakdown in cartilage, and pain gets progressively more severe. Dull, throbbing nighttime pain is characteristic, and may be accompanied by muscle weakness or deterioration.
 
Many of these symptoms can be relieved with rest. Overweight people are particularly susceptible to osteoarthritis. The additional weight contributes to the deterioration of cartilage and the development of bone spurs.
 
Rheumatoid arthritis is a major crippling disorder and the most serious form of arthritis. It is a complex, chronic inflammatory group of diseases, often affecting more than a dozen smaller joints during its course. In the foot, it frequently affects both ankles and toes.

 
Posttraumatic Arthritis can develop after an injury to the foot or ankle. Dislocations and fractures—particularly those that damage the joint surface—are the most common injuries that lead to posttraumatic arthritis. Like osteoarthritis, posttraumatic arthritis causes the cartilage between the joints to wear away. It can develop many years after the initial injury.
 
Arthritis treatments include: physical therapy and exercise; anti-inflammatory medication and/or steroid injections into the affected joint; orthotics or specially prescribed shoes; and joint replacement.
 

Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)
Commonly referred to as “poor circulation,” Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.) is the restriction of blood flow in the arteries of the leg. When arteries become narrowed by plaque (the accumulation of cholesterol and other materials on the walls of the arteries), the oxygen-rich blood flowing through the arteries cannot reach the legs and feet.
 
The presence of P.A.D. may be an indication of more widespread arterial disease in the body that can affect the brain, causing stroke, or the heart, causing a heart attack. Most people have no symptoms during the early stages of P.A.D. Often, by the time symptoms are noticed, the arteries are already significantly blocked.
 
Common symptoms of P.A.D. include:
  • Leg pain (cramping) that occurs while walking (intermittent claudication)
  • Leg pain (cramping) that occurs while lying down (rest pain)
  •  Leg numbness or weakness
  • Cold legs or feet
  • Sores that won’t heal on toes, feet, or legs
  • A change in leg color
  • Loss of hair on the feet and legs
  • Changes in toenails—color and thickness
If any of these symptoms are present, it is important to discuss them with your NorthPointe Foot  & Ankle podiatrist. Left untreated, P.A.D. can lead to debilitating and limb-threatening consequences.